Trump falsely claims exoneration. What does it mean?

Trump falsely claims exoneration. What does it mean?

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump falsely claimed exoneration from Robert Mueller on Wednesday even as the former special counsel told Congress he offered no such vindication.

Mueller spoke as few words as possible through the hours of hearings. But much of what he did say was bent by Trump and partisans on both sides to suit their purposes.

A look at some of the statements inside and outside the hearings:

Trump to his critics, in a fundraising letter from his 2020 campaign: “How many times do I have to be exonerated before they stop?”

The facts

Trump has not been exonerated by Mueller at all. “No,” Mueller said when asked at the hearing whether he had cleared the president of criminal wrongdoing in the investigation that looked into the 2016 Trump campaign’s relations with Russians.

In his report, Mueller said his team declined to make a prosecutorial judgment on whether to charge Trump, partly because of a Justice Department legal opinion that said sitting presidents shouldn’t be indicted.

What we learned from Robert Mueller: Seven hours, zero bombshells and everyone declares victory

‘End this witch hunt’: Donald Trump lights into Democrats after Mueller testimony

As a result, his detailed report factually laid out instances in which Trump might have obstructed justice, leaving it up to Congress to take up the matter.

As well, he looked into a potential criminal conspiracy between Russia and the Trump campaign and said the investigation did not collect sufficient evidence to establish criminal charges on that front.

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